Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Parenting’

The One Short-term Investment with Life-long Returns

2015-07-06 07.53.23Recently I was at an automotive service business run by a past SpringHill camper. When I picked up my car I asked this SpringHill alum for a tour of his business. You see I was not only interested in learning about his business but more importantly I wanted to get a glimpse into the life of one of our past campers.

After the tour we stood in the middle of his shop floor and talked about his life as a young entrepreneur. Our conversation drifted to SpringHill and reminiscing about those summers when his parents would drop he and his brothers off at camp. As we shared those memories together I could see his eyes lighting up. That’s when he said –

“It’s funny you’re here and we’re talking about camp because I was just recently thinking about my camp experiences. It’s become clear to me just how important they were in my development as a person. I was a shy, quiet kid. But at camp I gained confidence to interact with others and build positive relationships.”

Hearing him say this while sitting in the middle of his impressive business, brought to life the reality I’ve built my vocation on – that summer camp is an incredibly spiritual, emotional, and social building experience. Camp is one of those milestone moments where people’s live’s takes a quantum step forward.

And this is why SpringHill is so committed to creating life-transforming summer camp experiences. We see no other short-term experience in the world that provides young people such a life-long payback than attending summer camp. If there were, trust me, SpringHill would offer it in a New York minute. But there just isn’t.   There’s no other experience that provides the breath and depth of personal, long-term growth than summer camp.

Which means there is no better short-term investment with such a life-long payback that a person can make for the child they love then sending them to camp this summer.

 

So What Kind of Parent Are You?

068In my last post we looked at four ways to lead others – push, drag, carry or inspire.  In the days since it’s occurred to me that these are also four ways parents can lead their children. But before moving to those ways let’s be clear on one idea about parenting.  I’m convinced after 24 years of being a parent that the key responsibility we have as parents, maybe the only responsibility, is to lead our children.  This may seem obvious but the truth is many parents don’t lead, either because they don’t know how to or simply don’t believe it’s their place.  But the truth is the very first social organizations in history were not businesses, non-profits, or governments but instead it were families.  And since healthy organizations require leadership, we shouldn’t be surprised that healthy families need leadership and that every child needs to be lead.

So what are the ways a parent can lead their child?

Parents have the same options available as a leader of any organization – they can push, drag, carry or they can inspire their children.  Maybe the only difference is that as parents, especially parents of young children and adolescents, it’s appropriate to use all four ways  more often than you do when leading/parenting adults.  As a result, the key to successful parenting is having the wisdom to know when to lead which way.

Unfortunately this is usually where we make mistakes as parents.  We push when we should carry, we carry when we should inspire, we drag when a gentle nudge is all that is needed.

And just like leading teams, parents (myself included) can fall into one way of leading because it worked so well at one particular moment or season in our child’s life.  The tricky part is to be able to recognize the need to move away from a specific way when the child’s ready to be led differently.  We’ve seen this in the parenting of our own children, who are now adults.  When they were children,  we often dragged them to piano practice, pushed them to eat right, carried them when life was beyond their capacity to handle.  But as adults our children don’t want nor appreciate being pushed, dragged, and most often not even carried.  They do love and want to be inspired. A new season in our children’s life requires a shift in the way we parent.

How do we know we’re parenting the best way?  Our children should be accomplishing both our short-term goals (eating their vegetables) and our long-term goals (becoming people who don’t need to be pushed, pulled or carried).

So this leaves us with the question we all face as parents – are we ready to give up our go-to parenting ways for the better way in this moment or season of your child’s life?

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: