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Have a Great Plan so you can Enjoy the Journey -Leadership Lessons from the Appalachian Trail – Part 5

???????????????????????????????The AT has a very simple trail marking system. It’s a white line painted on trees or posts along the trail. So hiking the AT requires nothing more than looking up for white markers, looking down so you don’t trip over any rocks, and looking around at the incredible beauty along the way. Not much daily strategizing if you have a good plan as my son, MD, did.

You see MD spent a lot of time planning out the trip. He created a great itinerary for my week with him as well as his three weeks on his own. He did a lot of research, talked to people who had hiked the AT, and reviewed his thinking with others. All this work fed into a great plan.

So while on the trail we spent little time figuring out where we were going each day, or calculating how far we’d walk, etc. The plan was good and unless conditions changed there was no reason to spend any time rehashing it. Instead we just got up, packed our gear and followed those white markers to our next camp site, enjoying the trail and the people we met on the way.

It reminded me of the temptation we have to continually want to rehash and revisit well thought out plans. People like to arm-chair quarterback, to debate and to continually question where a team, department or organization is going and how they’re getting there. Some people also have a high need to change, tweak and continually adjust a plan, in an effort to find perfection.

But when you have a good plan, this additional work brings little value to the process or end results. Too often it keeps people from focusing on the immediate, day-to-day work, the plan requires. And, more importantly, the extra work distracts us from the joy, adventure, and relationships that the journey of making the plan a reality brings.

3 Comments Post a comment
  1. Michael,

    Being a teacher, I can totally relate to your last sentence. I’m not complaining, but sometimes the daily grind takes my focus off of what truly matters. Thank you for the summer reminder!

    July 31, 2014
    • Thanks Daniel for the comment. That sentence was a good reminder to me as I wrote it.

      August 1, 2014

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  1. Rain and doing Your Homework -Leadership Lessons from the Appalachian Trail – Part 6 | Michael Perry

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